Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Feng Shui: Making Room for Love


If you want to attract a new romantic partner--or move a casual relationship closer to commitment--make sure there is space for that person in your home. Look at your closets, shelves, and dressers, especially in the bedroom; if they are all filled to capacity with your own stuff, making some room for your current or future partner a priority.

Aim to free up 25% of the space in your bedroom for someone else's things. When you are done, take a moment to visualize your loved one's belongings finding a home there.

One is indeed the loneliest number - even when it comes to bedroom furnishings and decor. Having only one nightstand or space on only one side of the bed to climb in and out is very symbolic of solitude, and can actually hold your single status in place.



Single people also tend to have accessories and art that depict solitude, [like] a single flower in a vase. Instead, if you're single and don't want to be, decorate your bedroom as if a partner is already there. Symmetry is key, so position nightstands and lamps on both sides of the bed. Accessorize in pairs or multiples, too: Place a bunch of flowers in a vase and hang art depicting romance and unity, which Feng Shui gurus say creates a "couples' energy" as well as a sense of balance and abundance in the room.Get rid of stuffed animals, dolls, and excessive pillows. These items send the message to prospective overnight guests that the bed is already taken. These items also restrict free and spontaneous movement. Place pairs of candlesticks, vases, and books in the far right corner of your bedroom which is the Love and Marriage area of any space. Decorate as if you already have someone to share your bed with by putting nightstands and lamps on both sides of the bed. The images with which you surround yourself can have a powerful effect on your love life. Feng Shui clients who complain of difficulty finding romance often have surrounded themselves with images of a person alone. Inappropriate imagery includes anything that represents solitude, loneliness, aggression, hard work, conflict, or disagreement in any way. Replace any art that represents solitary, companionless objects with art that portrays pairs, such as two people, two flowers, and the like.


Be sure to place romantic imagery in these two key places in the bedroom: the wall opposite the foot of the bed (where you naturally look when lying in bed), and whatever area of the room you first see when you enter. Beautiful, romantic artwork is always good, as are fresh or silk flowers and anything in pairs (such as birds, cherubs, candles, or decorative pillows).That old photo of your Dad when he was in the army may be a treasure, but the wartime energy it carries doesn't have any place in the bedroom; find another place to keep it.Make sure both the front door of your home and the door to your bedroom open easily and completely. Doors that stick, squeak, or that only opens part way because of all the stuff stored behind them are blocking the flow of romantic energy and opportunity into your home. A loose doorknob on your bedroom door could mean you're having a hard time "getting a handle on" romance; get out your screwdriver and tighten it up.When you exercise in the bedroom, or store your sports equipment there, you bring the energy of hard work and exertion into your romance space.

 Do you want your relationship to feel like a tough workout? If not, move your workout stuff somewhere else; your relationship is likely to move along more smoothly.Go through your home--especially your bedroom--and remove anything that reminds you of past failed relationships; this could be an ex-boyfriend's old sweater you find in the closet, photographs of you with a previous partner, a gift that reminds you (unfavorably) of a giver with whom you are no longer in love--anything that reminds you of a love that went bad.


No matter how incurable a romantic you may be, do NOT keep old love letters anywhere in your bedroom unless they are from someone with whom you are still blissfully paired up. 
Walk slowly from your front door to your bedroom, pretending that you are a gentle river of chi. Look for any areas where furniture or other belongings are stopping or slowing the flow of chi, or where chi is diverted away from the bedroom to other areas of the house. Clear a path so fresh chi can find its way to your bedroom and nourish your love life. Make sure all the lights along this route are working, replace any burned-out bulbs, and be alert for dark or dingy corners where you can increase the energy by adding more light.


In the Bagua, the far right corner is the "love center”. Whether you're single or coupled, consider building a "shrine to love" in that spot. Accessorize a table, dresser or shelf with a photo of you and your mate (or other art that depicts a happy couple), a pair of candles, a book of romantic poetry and a heart-shaped box. It becomes an environmental affirmation of your relationship goals. Silk plants or flowers are OK, but never keep dried foliage here, since their symbolism is obvious.

Another Feng Shui no-no: king-sized beds. Not only do they create a physical chasm between you and your mate, but they are split down the middle by two box springs, which create a symbolic dividing line between partners that can affect their unity. If you're not about to trade in your beloved California King, even for the sake of your other beloved, a red sheet placed over the box springs will help unify the two separate halves.

No comments: